Research and Idea Generation: (There is no word count for this section. Make sure you address the requirements comprehensively but make it practical and useful – We don’t need long essays. Use lots of photographs and brief notes. Use whatever format you like but make sure it is something that can be linked or uploaded to eLearn)

    • 1.1 Identify Your Theme:
      Decide on a concept or theme that intrigues you. This theme will be the central idea of your portfolio. Document your choice and reasons for it.
    • 1.2 Conduct Research:
      Investigate your chosen theme using formal and informal research methods. Your research should include both historical and contemporary sources. Document your research findings. (Start by identifying keywords related
      to your theme. This could include broader topics, related terms, names of notable photographers who have worked on similar themes, specific techniques, time periods, movements, etc.)
    • 1.3 Analyse Information:
      After you have conducted your research, take some time to think about what it all means for your project. How do the facts, ideas, techniques, or inspirations you found relate to your theme? Do they inspire new ideas, change your existing ones, or confirm what you were already thinking? Reflect on how this information can shape or influence your photography. Write down your thoughts, reflections, and conclusions from this analysis. Remember, this is not just about summarising the information you found—it’s about understanding its potential impact on your work and documenting this understanding.
    • 1.4 Idea Development:
      Based on your research and analysis, brainstorm at least three distinct photography project ideas related to your theme.
      Here,
      you should identify three potential ideas, providing a brief description
      for each. Then, choose one concept for your portfolio and provide a rationale for your choice.

Identify Your Theme:
Decide on a concept or theme that intrigues you. This theme will be the central idea of your portfolio. Document your choice and reasons for it.

 

I have been contemplating some of these themes since I started on my photography student journey at the beginning of the year and feel like this is the perfect project to hone in on some of my conceptual creative ideas. I didn’t think that the opportunity may present itself this early in my journey into photography, nor within my first year at CIT, so I am excited to be able to bring one of these projects to life.

I am feeling drawn at this point of my exploration to portrait photography and photographing female-identifying personalities. I am intrigued by our place in society and the concepts surrounding female self-expression with overlapping adjacent themes.

I have spent a lot of this year focusing on landscape and astrophotography and I feel as though I have been doing this mainly as a way of avoiding people and not pushing myself out of my comfort zone. I haven’t felt like I have had the skills to be able to do portrait photography justice, and the fear of failure makes me quite uncomfortable. I would like to be able to eventually photograph people and be able to make money doing it, so the fear of failure or not being good enough is a real possibility. I have been slowly coming to terms with the idea that I just need to get out of my comfort zone and practice honing my skills otherwise there is no way of knowing if this is viable option for me moving forward.